Posts tagged invasive species

Coming soon to a tree near you! (Maybe.)

North Carolina has its fair share of invasive insects and diseases that threaten to destroy our natural resources. In 2011, laurel wilt was first found in the state. In 2012, thousand cankers disease was found. And in 2013, the first detection of the emerald ash borer was made. But what does the future hold? Will […]

Share

The Butterfly Effect: The impact of an invasive disease on native butterfly populations

Laurel wilt disease, a disease caused by a fungal pathogen, has already had major impacts on redbay trees across the Southeast. The pathogen is spread from tree to tree by the non-native redbay ambrosia beetle, a small insect that seeks out healthy redbays. A single beetle attacking a tree can spell doom and trees may […]

Share

S’mores, hot dogs and invasive species: Don’t move firewood for summer campouts

Ahhh … in case going outside into the sauna-like heat hasn’t reminded you, summer has officially arrived! Kids are out of school, meaning it’s a time to go to the pool, a time to relax and, for some families, a time to take a family vacation.  Many families may opt to explore the great outdoors […]

Share

Emerald ash borer-fighting wasps continue to be released

Almost a year ago, the emerald ash borer was detected in North Carolina for the first time. The invasive beetle, which bores into and kills ash trees, was found in four N.C. counties in 2013 (Granville, Person, Vance and Warren). From September to early November of last year, the N.C. Forest Service released wasps to […]

Share

The beautiful Bradford pear: In the eye of the beholder

After months of cold, ice and snowpocalypses, the first signs of spring are a welcome sight to North Carolina. Along with tulips popping their pretty heads up, the white, fluffy flowers of the Bradford pear tree are among the first bloomers, alerting North Carolinians that warmer weather lies just ahead. Yes, North Carolina, spring has […]

Share

Excellence in Action Award presented for cogongrass early detection and rapid response

Two employees of the North Carolina Forest Service were honored at the N.C. Invasive Plant Council’s Annual Meeting with the Excellence in Action Award for their keen eyes and quick reactions to control what many experts consider to be one of the world’s worst weed species. While assisting a landowner in Stanly County, Forester Tom […]

Share

Winter laurel wilt survey results: Minimum range expansion documented

As some trees fight for the arrival of spring by beginning to produce buds, the laurel wilt winter survey season comes to a close. Laurel wilt, a devastating disease of redbay and other plants in the laurel family, has already been found in six N.C. counties. The disease is best surveyed for in the winter […]

Share

Sting like a wasp: Small wasps released to attack invasive emerald ash borer

Earlier this year, the emerald ash borer was found in North Carolina for the first time. Dead and dying ash trees are already found in four N.C. counties and the beetle is likely to continue spreading. This wood-boring insect, which is native to Asia, was found in Michigan in 2002 and has rapidly spread throughout the […]

Share

Weeding out cogongrass in North Carolina

When invasive plants are introduced into an environment, they can cause major problems for native plants and wildlife. Some are worse than others, such as kudzu. But another non-native plant threatens the state and is thought to be much worse than kudzu and its car-engulfing capabilities. Cogongrass – considered by many experts to be one […]

Share

Emerald ash borer found for the first time in North Carolina

On May 28, the N.C. Forest Service was un-warmly welcomed back from the long holiday weekend.  During a standard check of emerald ash borer traps in Granville County, Forest Health staff and county personnel found the first evidence of emerald ash borer in North Carolina. N.C. Forest Service and NCDA&CS Plant Industry Division checked neighboring […]

Share